Louisville Public Media Expands Development Department With Three New Hires

 

 

 

 


Louisville Public Media is happy to announce the hiring of Cara Hicks as Digital Membership Manager, Marquel Lett as Director of Donor Relations, and Katherine Six as Grants Manager in its development department. The hirings fulfill three new positions at LPM
created by an American Journalism Project grant that adds critical business capacity and helps ensure long-term sustainability and growth of local news. 

As Digital Membership Manager, Hicks will focus on digital strategies for new member engagement. She brings a strong background serving Louisville’s arts community, holding marketing and leadership roles at Actors Theatre, Louisville Orchestra, Kentucky Opera and the Louisville Ballet.

As Director of Donor Relations, Lett will work with leadership to grow major gifts through building relationships in the community and stewarding donors. She comes to LPM from Louisville Central Community Centers, where she served as the Development & Public Relations Manager. Previously she served in donor relations roles at The Salvation Army of Memphis and the West End School. 

As Grants Manager, Katherine Six will oversee prospective and current grant opportunities and build relationships with local, regional and national funders. She has been working with local nonprofits in Louisville since 2015. Most recently, Six served as Executive Director for Educational Justice, where she established relationships with many local foundations to help achieve educational equity for Louisville’s students.

“We’re thrilled to welcome these three new members of our development team at Louisville Public Media,” said Ellen Oost, LPM’s Vice President of Development and Marketing. “This added capacity will enable us to better steward donors and foundations that make our work possible, and to experiment with new and innovative ways to fund our mission to inform, inspire and empower our community through news and music. When we grow support for LPM, we’re able to grow our public service.”

“Louisville Public Media is expanding their newsroom and playing a leading role in addressing the news crisis in their region,” said Michelle Srbinovich, Vice President of Portfolio Support at the American Journalism Project. “The American Journalism Project is investing in these new hires because we believe they will enable LPM to serve more communities, now and in the future. Kentucky residents deserve access to high quality local journalism and we encourage others to join us in supporting this essential civic institution.”

Six began at LPM on July 22, and Hicks began at LPM on August 4. Lett’s first day was Sept. 7. 

 

About the American Journalism Project

The American Journalism Project (AJP) is committed to a vision in which an independent, resilient, and ubiquitous civic press represents, informs, and engages every member of the diverse public it serves. Founded by pioneers in nonprofit journalism, AJP is a venture philanthropy organization that makes investments in mission-driven nonprofit local news organizations and dynamic entrepreneurs, provides strategic support, and is building a movement to reimagine the future of local news.

 

About Louisville Public Media

Louisville Public Media (LPM) is an independent, community supported not-for-profit corporation serving our community with three distinct public radio stations and an investigative unit: 89.3 WFPL News Louisville provides local, national and international news, public affairs and cultural programming; 90.5 WUOL Classical Louisville is our city’s only classical music radio station; 91.9 WFPK Independent Louisville showcases independent, alternative music and an array of musical genres; and the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting (KyCIR) shines the light of accountability on the people and institutions in power.

Louisville Public Media is also a proud member of the Kentucky Public Radio Network and manager of the Ohio Valley ReSource, a regional journalism collaborative reporting on economic and social change in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

 

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